ECCHR EXPLORE is a platform that playfully inspires us to dive into different discourses around the arts and human rights.

Experience our conversations in a unique, visually enhanced experience, that let’s you explore interconnected thoughts.

Bénédicte Savoy

Restitutionen und eine neue Ethik der Beziehungen
Im Gespräch mit Wolfgang Kaleck

Fred Ritchin

Artistic and Human Rights Interventions 1/4
A conversation with Wolfgang Kaleck

Rabih Mroué

Artistic and Human Rights Interventions 3/4
A conversation with Wolfgang Kaleck

Christina Varvia

Artistic and Human Rights Interventions 4/4
A conversation with Wolfgang Kaleck

Claudia Salazar Jiménez

The Blood of the Dawn
A conversation with Karina Theurer

Mark Sealy

Visuals of Violence
A conversation with Wolfgang Kaleck

Ixmucané Aguilar

Decolonizing the Camera in Practice
A conversation with Wolfgang Kaleck

Bénédicte Savoy

Restitutionen und eine neue Ethik der Beziehungen
Im Gespräch mit Wolfgang Kaleck

Kunsthistorikerin und Professorin an der TU Berlin spricht mit ECCHR-Generalsekretär Wolfgang Kaleck über Restitutionen von geraubter Kolonialkunst und ihre Kritik zur Debatte über das Humboldt Forum in Berlin.

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Fred Ritchin

Artistic and Human Rights Interventions 1/4
A conversation with Wolfgang Kaleck

Fred Ritchin, photographer and dean emeritus of the International Center of Photography, and ECCHR General Secretary Wolfgang Kaleck discuss the role graphic images have in photojournalism to raise political awareness. Looking at iconic historic examples, Ritchin unpacks widely-held ideas about documentary truth, examining how photography can shine light on violence and repression, while also questioning the ways in which this transmission might be limited.

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Rabih Mroué

Artistic and Human Rights Interventions 3/4
A conversation with Wolfgang Kaleck

Lebanese performance and video artist Rabih Mroué speaks with ECCHR General Secretary Wolfgang Kaleck about how he treats the impact of violent images in his work. Beginning with his piece PIXELATED REVOLUTION, which uses the moment of the civilian witness capturing violence on their cellphone camera, Mroué lays out a complicated web of connections between the witnessing acts of viewer, victim, and perpetrator.

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Christina Varvia

Artistic and Human Rights Interventions 4/4
A conversation with Wolfgang Kaleck

In this episode, we will look at several of Forensic Architecture’s investigations and working methodologies in Gaza, Germany, and Cameroon with architect and former deputy director of Forensic Architecture, Christina Varvia, and ECCHR General Secretary Wolfgang Kaleck.

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Claudia Salazar Jiménez

The Blood of the Dawn
A conversation with Karina Theurer

This episode is about the debut novel The Blood of the Dawn — La Sangre de la Aurora by Claudia Salazar Jiménez. Salazar Jiménez and Karina Theurer, director of ECCHR’s Institute for Legal Intervention, discuss the enduring consequences of gender discrimination, using fiction as a tool for visibility and for sensitizing us to the suffering of others.
Please be advised, this episode contains themes of sexual and gender-based violence that some listeners may find distressing.

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Mark Sealy

Visuals of Violence
A conversation with Wolfgang Kaleck

In this episode, curator and cultural historian Mark Sealy and Wolfgang Kaleck, ECCHR general secretary, talk about the challenges of visual representation.
They discuss the visuals of violence and the viewers’ responsibility and interrogate different ways of dealing with photography produced in colonial and postcolonial contexts. Sealy and Kaleck thereby try to answer the question: How do we deploy these images… and to what purpose?

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Ixmucané Aguilar

Decolonizing the Camera in Practice
A conversation with Wolfgang Kaleck

Guatemalan visual artist Ixmucané Aguilar joins Wolfgang Kaleck, ECCHR general secretary, to discuss her documentary photography practice exploring the enduring effects of German colonialism in Namibia and the genocide against the Herero and Nama. The conversation addresses the fragility of photography as a medium, the risk the photographer runs of imposing their values upon their subject, the importance of collective evidence and recognizing the many nuances of truth.

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Restitutionen und eine neue Ethik der Beziehungen
Warum will man als Museum das Wort Restitution nicht hören? Weil das Wort Restitution in sich Zeit trägt, durch "re", also "wieder". Es ist etwas vorher passiert und es wird wiederhergestellt. Die Zeit dazwischen ist im Wort.
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Artistic and Human Rights Interventions 1/4
One of the big issues for me in photography is: can we be more proactive? Peace photography as opposed to waiting for the apocalypse and making graphic images of it to raise the conscience? Can we actually do anything? The climate change in many ways to diminish the possibility of the worst happening.
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Artistic and Human Rights Interventions 3/4
Whenever I deal with war images I try to avoid being judgmental. I go for other things like to ask questions on the image itself, on myself, to question my beliefs, my concerns... and put questions. In this sense, I’m dealing with these images.
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Artistic and Human Rights Interventions 4/4
What I wanted to talk about is to suggest a different practice of working with images, working with images as evidence, working with footage and materials that somehow not only tell stories, but are able to be used as pieces of evidence for different forums.
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The Blood of the Dawn
It’s something, as you just mentioned, something real that happens everywhere in any conflict: always women’s bodies are used as a as a battlefield and they are used as a way to attack the enemy. So it’s not only the enemy that is attacked directly, but the women’s bodies are used for this.
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Visuals of Violence
Let’s unpick of politics of race. Let’s unpick the politics of representation, open the field and enter into new epistemes, new knowledge systems, that in theory will help bring us closer together in terms of understanding who and how difference works across the planet.
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Decolonizing the Camera in Practice
This might be because my work involves these deeply emotional issues of myself as a human being, as a woman, as someone who was born in political exile. My work at once faces my own personal questions in life, and yet I’m interested in creating a larger discourse of Namibia’s reality.
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